Wintellect Blogs

A Late Synopsis Of The Angular NG-Conf Day 2

Jason Hill

2 May , 2017  

talk

Day 2 of ng-conf was a fair day.  Multiple talks and activities took place all day long.  Not being able to clone myself and see all of the discussions, I set my focus on a particular path for the day.  So let’s take a look at the path I chose.

RxJS: The Good Parts

The title of this talk caught my attention as it pays homage to JavaScript the Good Parts by Douglas Crockford.  The talk focused on some of the most frequently used RxJS operators such as filter(), map(), reduce() as well as observable methods such as .switchMap(), .mergeMap() and .zip() to name a few.  Towards the end of the talk, the speakers provided a performance comparison.  The comparison was for execution times needed to manipulate a collection of numbers using plain JavaScript vs. RxJS operators and methods.  Not a surprise RxJS had better performance as it wasn’t iterating over the data multiple times to complete the same operations.

Angular Performance Birds of a Feather

Unfortunately, the time slot for the RxJS presentation cut into this talk.  I was able to catch half of the speakers, and even then, it was very informative.  The format for this presentation was a series of lightning talks from representatives of multiple companies talking about how they squeeze the most out of their Angular apps.  … Read more

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Wintellect Blogs

NG-CONF 2017 Day Three Highlights

Dave Baskin

11 Apr , 2017  

ng conf 2017

Keynote

Brad Green spent some time discussing how Google as a company is fully embracing Angular as an application development framework. In fact, the goal is to have all web application development within Google to be using Angular by the end of 2017. He also explained that it makes sense for them to invest so many resources into Angular as an open-source project because of the additional benefits to Google itself. The primary benefit is the large ecosystem that has grown around Angular. Libraries and tools would probably not exist if Angular was simply an internal Google project. In addition, Google has built several tools internally that have been reproduced in other open-source projects. It makes sense that there is benefit to sharing these efforts with the community. It also helps with hiring within Google, where proprietary in-house tools require additional training and ramp-up for new hires. And, of course, the overall quality of the source code is improved by the great feedback received from the community through PRs, documentation, and training.

For example, the Angular team originally went down the path of creating its own JavaScript super-set called AtScript. It became evident that TypeScript was a more viable option, though, so the Angular team abandoned this effort and fully embraced TypeScript.… Read more

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Wintellect Blogs

NG-Conf 2016 – Day Three Wrap Up

Dave Baskin

6 May , 2016  

The last day of ng-conf 2016 continued with lots of great information. Some highlights:

  • Daniel Rosenwasser gave a good overview of TypeScript and a little bit of its history. He also demonstrated benefits of using TypeScript with Javascript directly. It can be beneficial in catching things in regular Javascript code (serving a similar purpose to the ESLint Javascript lint tool). He also showed some new features coming in TypeScript, like async/await and handling null and undefined types.
  • Aysegul Yonet talked about the new features of pipes in Angular2, including how pipes can be configured to better handle change detection.
  • Ken Synder presented details about transclusion updates. In Angular1 you can now have multiple slots for injecting transcluded elements. The ng-transclude directive now supports a name property and directives can specify multiple transclusion slots that correspond to these names. This allows Angular1 to come closer to how ng-content tags work in Angular2.
  • Matias Niemela gave a whirlwind tour of the new animation features in Angular2. After evaluating the different options of working with animations in the DOM (through CSS transitions, Key Frames, or direct Javascript), they settled on using Javascript, which they call “web animations”. The benefit is that it gives an application very fine-tuned control over animations, works around various issues with key frames and CSS transitions, provides better performance and less UI jank, and allows for better rendering (including in offline scenarios).
Read more

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Wintellect Blogs

The Future of Angular2, and More Updates From NG-Conf 2016

Dave Baskin

5 May , 2016  

Some highlights of day two of ng-conf 2016:

  • Day two started with a focus on the future of Angular2. No, they didn’t announce Angular3, but they did focus on the work they are finishing up and looking towards the future. For example, work is in progress to build an offline compiler for Angular2 applications. This should greatly reduce the payload delivered to the browser. In fact the Angular2 team’s aggressive goal is to have the “Hello World” version of an an Angular2 application be only 10K!
  • A second release candidate came out today. Part of the changes from beta to release candidate includes changing the package references. For example, angular2/core is now referenced as @angular/core. This change allows for better use of the ES2015 modules and better optimization when using the offline compiler.
  • The Material Design team is creating a base set of services that are common to user interface components in general, such as mobile usage, accessibility, internationalization, overlays, and more. The broad set of material design components build on these services, but other components can as well. They are also looking to expand the set of components to things like a Google Map component, a video player, rich text editor, and more.
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Wintellect Blogs

Highlights From Angular’s NG-Conf 2016

Dave Baskin

4 May , 2016  

I just finished up the first day of ng-conf 2016 and as usual, it has been a great informative conference. Thanks to the organizers, sponsors, and Angular team members for all your efforts.

Here are some highlights from today:

  • Brad Green’s keynote address, of course, covered the big picture of the Angular development work. The Angular1 site had 1.3 million visitors and the Angular2 site has already had 306 thousand visitors, even though the first release candidate was only made available yesterday. The team is focused on making Angular2 a robust framework, but there are still some gaps to fill before it will be ready for production release.
  • What was really impressive is the breadth of applications that can be created with Angular2. Web applications we all know and love are just part of the story. You can create progressive apps that can be used offline. You can create mobile web applications with native-like user interface using Ionic. You can create truly native mobile applications with NativeScript. You can create cross-platform desktop application on top of Electron.
  • If need a quick look at what Angular2 actually looks like, John Papa does a great job of live-coding an Angular2 application.
Read more

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Wintellect Blogs

ng-conf 2015 – Office Apps Hack-a-thon

Dave Baskin

5 Mar , 2015  

The night before ng-conf 2015 started, there were a number of lightning talks and hack-night activities. You might be surprised to see Microsoft as part of the mix. With the lure of several Xbox Ones to give away, there ended up being 11 teams competing for the prizes. Josh Carroll and I represented “Team Wintellect”.

Why was Microsoft here? If you’ve been keeping up, the “new” Microsoft has really done a lot to be more open and work with technology outside of Microsoft. Tonight, they were talking about building AngularJS application as add-ons to Office 365 applications. These are Javascript-based components that can inject new functionality into Excel, Outlook, and others. (There is more detailed information at the Office Dev Center web site).

Our task was to take one of Andrew Connell’s starter projects:

And create our own project that demonstrates some interesting add-on functionality to one of these office apps.

Oh … and there was only two hours to complete it!

Josh and I decided to take a D3.js visualization, specifically this Aster Plot, and have it take the data from an Excel spreadsheet rather than from a CSV file.… Read more

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