Wrapping Up CodeStock 2015

Wintellect has been glad to be a sponsor of CodeStock for several years now. This year Josh Carroll, Keith Rome, and myself presented on AngularJS and Xamarin topics. It was great having such a larger audience this year (over 900 people attended!) Thanks to all the CodeStock staff and support folks that made this year overwhelmingly successful! If you…

Turn off the Attach Security Warning Dialog in Visual Studio

How many clicks has this dialog eaten out of your life? The idea for the warning is good because, you know, SECURITY. However, if you’re developing web apps or anything running in IIS, this gets old by the thousandth time you click the Attach button. It’s easy to turn off with an undocumented registry key.…

From Zero to Hero in Xamarin Forms in 53 Minutes

Looking for a fast way to get up to speed on Xamarin Forms? There are tons of learning resources out there, including a series of articles I published this spring, the first of which can be found here. But while some developers prefer learning by reading, others find video training the best learning medium. Which…

Handling the Back Button in Windows 10 UWP Apps

The cool thing about Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps is that they run on an assortment of devices, from PCs, tablets, and phones to (soon) Xboxes and HoloLens, among others. Personally, I can’t wait to see some of the apps I’ve written light up on my kids’ Xbox. They’ll think I’m a hero (“my dad…

Angular2 Databinding is Fast!

I’ve been working with the Angular2 alpha ever since ng-conf 2015, and it has been pretty awesome to see how the framework is shaping up. I’ll be the first to admit that the bleeding edge tax is high, but it has been worth it to see just how powerful the next version of Angular is…

Azure Bits #3 – Adding a Message to an Azure Queue

In Azure Bits #2 – Saving the Image to Azure Blob Storage, we were able to save our image to Azure Blob Storage and verify that this all went according to plan after re-publishing our site to Azure. In this Azure Bit, we will take a look at the Azure Queue service and we will…

Pooling Buffers for Better Memory Management

Occasionally, you need a more robust solution to solve a problem. In my last post, I wrote about the horrors of this small code snippet: [code language=”csharp”] public byte[] Serialize(object o) { using (var stream = new MemoryStream()) { MySerializer.Serialize(stream, o); return stream.ToArray(); } } [/code] One way to alleviate the memory pressure that can…

Deploying an ES6, JSPM, NodeJS Application to Azure

I have a simple NodeJS application that I want to deploy to Microsoft Azure. Fortunately, there already exists detailed instructions, on how to accomplish this. But I want to add a couple of extra things. The Node application will be written using ES6, the latest version of Javascript, and also use JSPM, a newer generation…

Azure Bits #2 – Saving the Image to Azure Blob Storage

Creating the Azure Storage Account In Azure Bits #1 – Up and Running, we got a skeleton in place for our web application that will allow the user to upload an image and we published our Azure Image Manipulator Web App to Azure.  Our next task is taking this uploaded image and saving it into…

Lighting up Native Platform Features in Xamarin Forms – Part 2

In the previous post I implemented a custom attached property to be used in Xamarin Forms XAML when a built-in accessory view is desired on a table cell. In this follow-up we will continue and build out the iOS renderer that is responsible for actually enabling the feature in our running application. What about Android…

Lighting up Native Platform Features in Xamarin Forms – Part 1

In my last few posts I introduced a simple app that lets you browse the various built-in font variations supported by Xamarin Forms. If you recall, the application adopted a “stack navigation” design, which is quite common in mobile applications. However, there is one small flaw with our implementation so far – on the iOS…

Hey, Who Stole All My Memory?

Sometimes a little piece of seemingly innocuous code can cause a significant amount of trouble: [code language=”csharp”] public byte[] Serialize(object o) { using (var stream = new MemoryStream()) { MySerializer.Serialize(stream, o); return stream.ToArray(); } } [/code] Doesn’t look like much, but I’m sure we have all written something like this and paid it no mind.…
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